During the rehabilitation and reconstruction of pavement, there are a variety of traffic control strategies that are crucial to keeping your work crews and the traveling public safe. Effective work zone traffic management is prioritized to keep everyone safe, by knowing controlled traffic patterns and expectations of the work zone. Here are some key reasons as to why proper work zone traffic management is needed during pavement rehabilitation and reconstruction:

  • Safety – The top priority of any work zone is to keep workers & travelers safe from start to finish, and to minimize the risk of on the job accidents.
  • User Delay Costs – By scheduling proper work windows and creating alternative traffic routes, you can significantly reduce traffic delays & congestion caused by the work zone.
  • Access – Create proper systems to ensure that surrounding businesses and residences are accessible.
  • Construction Quality, Cost, & Productivity – Prioritize quality of construction and safety, while still operating in a timely and cost efficient way.
  • Pavement Performance: Construct high-quality, smooth & durable pavements.
  • Environmentally Sustainable – Work to minimize the use of fuel in work zones and in traffic flow by providing efficient work & minimal traffic build ups.

What to Consider Before Developing a Traffic Control Strategy:

Rehabilitation Considerations:

  • Work zone length
  • Night work lighting
  • Large equipment maneuvering
  • Location of concrete plant
  • The allowance of longitudinal joints vs. just lane lines
  • Edge drop-offs
  • Entry/exit to businesses. residences, ramps, etc.
  • Surface cleanliness maintenance
  • Curing time requirements
  • Impact of shoulder grade raising
  • Need for Lane Widening for traffic control
  • Encroachment of adjacent lanes by slipform paver tracks or performance of other repairs
  • Construction staging activities
  • Precast element allowance to accelerate construction

Reconstruction Considerations:

  • Work zone length
  • Work zone lighting
  • Allowance of maneuvering pavement trains
  • Location of concrete plant
  • The allowance of longitudinal joints vs. just lane lines
  • Edge drop-offs
  • Entry/exit to businesses. residences, ramps, etc.
  • Crown or cross-slope alterations
  • Curing time requirements
  • Encroachment of adjacent lanes by slipform paver tracks or performance of other repairs
  • Haul road configuration
  • Structural Capacity of structures – bridges, shoulders, detour pavements, etc.
  • Temporary drainage
  • Need for Lane Widening for traffic control
  • Allowance of a temporarily accelerated construction schedule

Developing a Traffic Control Strategy Right for the Job

1. Identifying Feasible Alternatives

When pinpointing feasible rehabilitation opinions for pavement construction, a variety of issues must be addressed, besides simply the condition of the current pavement. A few examples are listed below:

  • The number & duration of work phases needed to complete the work.
  • The length of the work area
  • Number or work areas
  • What temporary draining provisions are needed
  • The constructional capacity of the pavement, barriers, bridges, shoulders, etc.
  • Construction feasibility
  • Existing traffic control devices and the conflict they might cause with work zone
  • Winter restrictions and potential delays caused by weather
  • Business & residential traffic access
  • Proper lighting requirements
  • Additional special considerations

2. Consider Planning Issues

Various planning issues must be considered when developing a traffic control strategy. These planning issues can relate to factors such as, scoping, traffic management, construction requirements, work zone & public safety, etc.

3. Compare Alternatives

In step three, the feasible alternatives identified in step one are analyzed and compared based on the determined needs of the work project. Based on their analysis they can then determine the best course of action for the job.

4. Choose Recommended Strategy

During this step, a course of action & strategy will be finalized, a traffic control plan will be implemented and communicated to all parties involved in the project.

5. Determine Phasing/Key Constraints/Special Provisions

The final step to developing a good temporary traffic control strategy involves identifying the project phasing, key constraints, and other specific provisions. This phase can involve a contingency strategy for unexpected or unusual conditions, a traffic detour plan, and other construction provisions.

In summary, considering these traffic control factors and steps will lead pavement work crews to a safer, more efficient, and high quality work experience that can get every job done right, every time! Interested in learning more about Bird Dog Traffic Control and how we can help you provide proper safety services and support?

Get in touch with us!